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Whakaohonga nā Kahungatanga: Awakening from Addiction

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posted on 03.11.2021, 09:36 by Hughes, Hemaima Mariana

Alcohol and other drug (AOD) use, abuse and addiction are destructive to Māori and are an urgent problem; wairuatanga, cultural identity and tino rangatiratanga (self determination) are key to successful recovery ffom AODs for Maori. Kaupapa Māori AOD services have better success rates because they provide what is essential for Māori such as tikanga, core beliefs, values and practices of Maori re health, illness, wairua, tapu, noa and life. There are strategies for addressing the problem of AOD addiction for Māori such as positive stories of recovery. This thesis explores the shared experiential journeys of four Pūkōrero (participants) who successfully completed detoxification and recovery programmes from AOD addiction. Three questions were used to guide the research process to enable the Pūkōrero to identify positive aspects of their individual detoxification and recovery programmes, surface any barriers and issues they experienced, and clarify the support they received throughout the process. Kaupapa Maori and Narrative Inquiry was adapted to undertake this study to capture the essence of Maori thinking and reality regarding AOD. Through the use of thematic analysis the data findings of the study reflect the views from each Pūkōrero of Wairua, Whakapapa and Whānau as key to their successful recovery. This supports the notion that a pathway of detoxification, recovery and hope exists to enable Maori and others to take the journey to reclaim their own health and well-being, and the health and well-being of Whānau, Hapū, Iwi, and Māori community. In honour of these Pūkōrero, Kāumatua, Tipuna, Whānau, Hapū, Iwi, Māori katoa, and to celebrate Kaupapa Maori and Narrative Inquiry [as the preferred methodological approach], the use of our tino ataahua reo integrated with English throughout the thesis demonstrates the interwoven connections between the two cultures enshrined in Te Tiriti o Waitangi that comprise the nation of Aotearoa me Te Waipounamu of New Zealand.

History

Copyright Date

01/01/2007

Date of Award

01/01/2007

Publisher

Te Herenga Waka—Victoria University of Wellington

Rights License

Author Retains Copyright

Degree Discipline

Nursing

Degree Grantor

Te Herenga Waka—Victoria University of Wellington

Degree Level

Masters

Degree Name

Master of Arts (Applied)

Victoria University of Wellington Item Type

Awarded Research Masters Thesis

Language

en_NZ

Victoria University of Wellington School

Graduate School of Nursing, Midwifery and Health

Advisors

Walsh, Chris; Wood, Pamela; Puckey, Thelma