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The Value of Large Scale Tourism in Samoa

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thesis
posted on 12.11.2021, 22:21 by Park, Donald Dongsik

During the mid to late seventies serious questions were raised regarding the value of mass tourism. This lead to the creation of the alternative development paradigm with its preference towards small scale, local and community based and controlled projects which have gained wide acceptance within the field of development studies. This research looks to reopen and examine the case against mass tourism as a development tool under the following arguments: · The initial assessment was done in the late seventies and a combination of changes in business practices and consumer demands for ethical behaviour has potentially changed the development outcomes for host nations · Governments have a greater and more balanced awareness of the range of development issues and enterprises need to respond to this · Alternative development suffers from similar criticisms to those that have been directed at mass tourism as well as some unique issues · Labour force training has been largely overlooked as critical step in maximising potential development outcomes for host nations · Two major critiques around power inequality (Britton 1983) and empowerment (Sofield 2003) are external subjective judgements about development outcomes where feedback and conclusions from within host populations might add additional insight. A survey questioning the impact a large scale development had on people’s lives was central to the research. However, due to difficulties getting survey data from a large scale development in Samoa the research has focused on providing the arguments above from literature and on secondary research aims of seeking the governments views and strategies to deal with tourism and linking these strategies back to literature.

History

Copyright Date

01/01/2013

Date of Award

01/01/2013

Publisher

Te Herenga Waka—Victoria University of Wellington

Rights License

Author Retains Copyright

Degree Discipline

Development Studies

Degree Grantor

Te Herenga Waka—Victoria University of Wellington

Degree Level

Masters

Degree Name

Master of Development Studies

Victoria University of Wellington Item Type

Awarded Research Masters Thesis

Language

en_NZ

Victoria University of Wellington School

School of Geography, Environment and Earth Sciences

Advisors

Overton, John