Open Access Te Herenga Waka-Victoria University of Wellington
Browse
thesis_access.pdf (1.61 MB)

Tall Poppy Syndrome & Patriarchal Femininity: An Auto-ethnographic Investigation into New Zealand’s Female-identifying Comedians

Download (1.61 MB)
Version 2 2023-02-23, 00:55
Version 1 2021-07-26, 23:23
thesis
posted on 2021-07-26, 23:23 authored by Hill, Katherine

This practice-based and auto-ethnographic research project explores the correlation between Tall Poppy Syndrome (TPS) and patriarchal femininity in the performances of female-identifying stand-up comedians in New Zealand. I identify ways TPS, as a patriarchal ideology, has an impact on the subconscious/and or conscious choices of New Zealand’s self-deprecating female-identifying comedians in contemporary performance. I have chosen to analyse TPS through an intersectional feminist lens, focusing on ways the historical construction of patriarchal femininity directly relates to the cultural phenomenon of Tall Poppy Syndrome. I aim to connect this relationship to the ways New Zealand female-identifying comedians ‘perform’ autobiographical comedy, as part of expected social and cultural conventions. As I want to investigate the impact of TPS in an exclusively New Zealand context, my research isolates its case studies to comedians who make comedy primarily for a New Zealand audience, discussing international comedians as a point of comparison.

History

Advisor 1

Hyland, Nicola

Copyright Date

2021-07-26

Date of Award

2021-07-26

Publisher

Victoria University of Wellington - Te Herenga Waka

Rights License

CC BY-SA 4.0

Degree Discipline

Theatre

Degree Grantor

Victoria University of Wellington - Te Herenga Waka

Degree Level

Masters

Degree Name

Master of Arts

ANZSRC Type Of Activity code

1 PURE BASIC RESEARCH

Victoria University of Wellington Item Type

Awarded Research Masters Thesis

Language

en_NZ

Victoria University of Wellington School

School of English, Film, Theatre, Media Studies and Art History