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Primary teacher burnout: Through the lens of theory and experience

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posted on 15.04.2021, 21:47 by Warnock, Sara

This mixed method study explores Burnout in New Zealand’s primary teachers and introduces the concept of Workplace Spirituality as a possible burnout mediator. Six published self-report scales derived from international findings were used to explore teachers experiences of burnout in relation to attributions, efficacy, emotional intelligence, and use of emotional labour strategies within a New Zealand context. Semi-structed interviews with participating teachers then facilitated phenomenological understanding of these constructs. Findings suggest that Emotional Labour is an unavoidable and fundamentally fatiguing requirement of teaching that requires greater acknowledgement and support. Recommendations urge robust supervision as part of greater investment in social and emotional learning programmes that prioritise supporting and increasing teacher’s capacity to care for their own mental and emotional needs. These programmes need to be led by compassionate leaders who recognise the importance of caring for their teachers and who are properly equipped to do so. By exploring spirituality through the lens of connection and meaningful work we are invited to transcend the confines of spirituality- as-religion to a greater awareness of ourselves as humans, which may be the key to understanding what systemic change is required to avoid perpetuating inherently burnout inducing systems.

History

Advisor 1

Johnston, Michael

Advisor 2

Bowden, Chris

Copyright Date

15/04/2021

Date of Award

15/04/2021

Publisher

Victoria University of Wellington - Te Herenga Waka

Rights License

Author Retains Copyright

Degree Discipline

Education

Degree Grantor

Victoria University of Wellington - Te Herenga Waka

Degree Level

Masters

Degree Name

Master of Education

ANZSRC Type Of Activity code

School of Education

Victoria University of Wellington Item Type

Awarded Research Masters Thesis

Language

en_NZ

Victoria University of Wellington School

School of Education