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Preaching and Practising: a Retrospective Exploration of Goals and Innovative Developments in the Administration of Intellectual Property Rights

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thesis
posted on 12.11.2021, 14:15 authored by Momoh, Ama Vivian

The management of innovation is a common phrase in many conversations about modern business management. However, management innovation has comparatively less recognition despite claims that it is one of the key components to organisational development in the 21st Century (Hamel, 2006). This study explores the generation and adoption of management innovation, within an organisation that administers legal rights for the commercialisation of innovation in New Zealand. The exploration focuses on the implementation of changes within Intellectual Property Office of New Zealand (IPONZ), seeking evidence of innovative changes in management. Identified management innovations are examined to uncover their functions and effects within the context of IPONZ’s purpose, articulated through goal setting. The study utilises case study methodology, borrowing from phenomenological methods to carry out an in-depth analysis of unfolding events at the organisation. Perceptions within the organisation and historical information were used to establish the occurrence of events. The organisation was examined holistically, with exploration including all areas of operation. Both primary and secondary data informs the research analysis and conclusions, guided by developments in previous innovation studies and literature on the use of goals. The prescribed Goal Setting Theory of Locke and Latham (1979) was examined to consider the effects goal setting has on performance. It was found that at IPONZ, changes implemented were a direct result of the goals that were set. In a period of holistic transformation, some goals were set as the successful implementation of change initiatives. Findings point to implications that the manner in which goals are set affects the amount and nature of changes that are implemented. The highest number of changes and management innovations were introduced in periods where changes were part of official performance expectations. All management innovations found were contextually novel, and were closely linked to the introduction of a holistic transformation project.

History

Copyright Date

01/01/2012

Date of Award

01/01/2012

Publisher

Te Herenga Waka—Victoria University of Wellington

Rights License

Author Retains Copyright

Degree Discipline

Management

Degree Grantor

Te Herenga Waka—Victoria University of Wellington

Degree Level

Masters

Degree Name

Master of Commerce and Administration

Victoria University of Wellington Item Type

Awarded Research Masters Thesis

Language

en_NZ

Victoria University of Wellington School

Victoria Management School

Advisors

Mabin, Vicky