07293682.2021.pdf (5.16 MB)
Download file

The role of business agglomerations in stimulating static and social activities in multicultural streets

Download (5.16 MB)
journal contribution
posted on 12.10.2021, 23:23 by M Lesan, Morten GjerdeMorten Gjerde
Urban designers and city planners are increasingly interested in how streets can support social activities. Street-based social activities are influenced by relationships between the street’s physical characteristics, the business activities that take place there and how these two factors are managed over time. As New Zealand’s population becomes more diverse, a key challenge is to design and manage public spaces so that people from different socio-cultural backgrounds can enjoy spending time there. The ethnic retail phenomenon is considered one of the most recognisable symbols of multiculturalism. In many cases, the identity of an ethnic neighbourhood has developed around a specific mix of retailing activities. Despite this, very little work has been done to identify the characteristics of shops and businesses along streets that can help stimulate social intercourse. This paper explores how commercial business agglomerations can support efforts to make streets more culturally diverse. Through observations of activity along streets and interviews with people from three ethnically diverse communities in New Zealand, it was revealed that the extent to which streets become the public domain of different ethnic groups is dependent on the retail activities on offer. We conclude with reflections about the importance of municipal intervention and management for multicultural planning practice in streets.

History

Preferred citation

Lesan, M. & Gjerde, M. (2021). The role of business agglomerations in stimulating static and social activities in multicultural streets. Australian Planner, 57(1), 65-84. https://doi.org/10.1080/07293682.2021.1931898

Journal title

Australian Planner

Volume

57

Issue

1

Publication date

01/01/2021

Pagination

65-84

Publisher

Informa UK Limited

Publication status

Published

Online publication date

27/05/2021

ISSN

0729-3682

eISSN

2150-6841

Language

en