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Native and nonnative use of multi-word vs. one-word verbs

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journal contribution
posted on 01.02.2021, 01:22 by A Siyanova, N Schmitt
One of the choices available in English is between one-word verbs (train at the gym) and their multi-word counterparts (work out at the gym). Multi-word verbs tend to be colloquial in tone and are a particular feature of informal spoken discourse. Previous research suggests that English learners often have problems with multi-word verbs, and may even avoid their use. This study explores this issue further by comparing the likelihood of using multi-word vs. one-word verbs by both native speakers and advanced nonnatives. A questionnaire of 26 multi-word/one-word verb pairs showed that nonnatives were less likely to use multi-word verbs than native speakers in informal spoken contexts. Moreover, the amount of exposure to native-speaking environments did not have an effect on the likelihood of using the multi-word verbs. However, a corpus analysis of the same verb pairs showed that the one-word verbs are often more frequent in both written and spoken discourse. © © Walter de Gruyter 2007.

History

Preferred citation

Siyanova, A. & Schmitt, N. (2007). Native and nonnative use of multi-word vs. one-word verbs. IRAL - International Review of Applied Linguistics in Language Teaching, 45(2), 119-139. https://doi.org/10.1515/IRAL.2007.005

Journal title

IRAL - International Review of Applied Linguistics in Language Teaching

Volume

45

Issue

2

Publication date

19/06/2007

Pagination

119-139

Publisher

Walter de Gruyter GmbH

Publication status

Published

ISSN

0019-042X

eISSN

1613-4141

Language

en