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Imperial Pandemicide

journal contribution
posted on 2023-08-28, 04:11 authored by Douglas Van BelleDouglas Van Belle, Thomas JamiesonThomas Jamieson
Objective: To provide a quick, in the moment analysis of the social and political aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic to preserve the possibly ephemeral aspects that might be overlooked in future historical studies. Methods: Qualitative and a statistical analyses of real time information. Results: The clustering of former imperial powers as states suffering extreme initial impacts, combined with a brief qualitative commentary on the domestic politics related to the pandemic response, suggests that colonial imperialism has lingering domestic political effects. Conclusion: The domestic political power bases that enabled colonial imperialism may be a significant and previously unrecognized factor in politics both in the context of disaster response and more broadly.

History

Preferred citation

Van Belle, D. A. & Jamieson, T. (2020). Imperial Pandemicide. Social Science Quarterly, 101(5), 1995-2000. https://doi.org/10.1111/ssqu.12854

Journal title

Social Science Quarterly

Volume

101

Issue

5

Publication date

2020-09-01

Pagination

1995-2000

Publisher

Wiley

Publication status

Published

Online publication date

2020-08-17

ISSN

0038-4941

eISSN

1540-6237

Language

en

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