Monist.Final.EpistemicInjustice.pdf (118.82 kB)
Download file

Finding your voice in the streets: Street art and epistemic injustice

Download (118.82 kB)
journal contribution
posted on 11.10.2021, 20:39 by Sondra BacharachSondra Bacharach
I argue that activists have co-opted street art as a tool for addressing epistemic injustices, injustices that result from negative identity prejudices that silence certain groups of people unfairly. To defend this claim, I explore the special nature of street art that makes it an especially appropriate tool for activists to enlist in the fight against epistemic injustices. From there, I will examine in detail two case studies which illustrate how street art is used to respond to and correct for these injustices: first, the street art series, "Stop Telling Women to Smile" by Tatyana Fazlalizadeh, and then Chris Metzger's Inside Out Project in Baltimore. Drawing on these examples, I highlight the features in virtue of which street art constitutes a particularly effective tool for correcting epistemic injustices.

History

Preferred citation

Bacharach, S. (2018). Finding your voice in the streets: Street art and epistemic injustice. Monist, 101(1), 31-43. https://doi.org/10.1093/monist/onx033

Journal title

Monist

Volume

101

Issue

1

Publication date

01/01/2018

Pagination

31-43

Publisher

Oxford University Press (OUP)

Publication status

Published

Online publication date

02/01/2018

ISSN

0026-9662

eISSN

2153-3601

Language

en

Usage metrics

Categories

Exports