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Divergent Paths of State-Society Relations in European and Trans-Tasman Economic Integration

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journal contribution
posted on 18.05.2021, 02:49 by Matthew Castle, S Le Quesne, J Leslie
Observers of transnational market integration in Europe and elsewhere tend to assume a direct relationship between economic complementarity — high levels of economic transactions between countries — and depth of integration. Economic complementarity provides greater opportunities for private actors to capture the benefits of integration and is therefore assumed to be a source of social ‘demand’ required for integration. This article challenges this conventional wisdom. Australia and New Zealand have achieved a level of market integration that is comparable to that in Europe. Yet, the two countries lack economic complementarity, suggesting an alternative mechanism to the one outlined above. Rather than social groups ‘demanding’ integration vis-à-vis policy-makers’ reluctance to ‘supply’ it, in the trans-Tasman case, policy-makers led integration as the source of both ‘supply’ and ‘demand’. This observation suggests the need to question, rather than assume, the empirical sources of supply of, and demand for, efforts to coordinate economic markets transnationally.

History

Preferred citation

Castle, M., Le Quesne, S. & Leslie, J. (2016). Divergent Paths of State-Society Relations in European and Trans-Tasman Economic Integration. Journal of European Integration, 38(1), 41-59. https://doi.org/10.1080/07036337.2015.1057819

Journal title

Journal of European Integration

Volume

38

Issue

1

Publication date

02/01/2016

Pagination

41-59

Publisher

Informa UK Limited

Publication status

Published

Online publication date

09/07/2015

ISSN

0703-6337

eISSN

1477-2280

Language

en