Consortium Computing Proof Copy.pdf (972.21 kB)
Download file

Consortium Computing and Time Slicing in the Banking Sector: Databank Systems Ltd New Zealand

Download (972.21 kB)
journal contribution
posted on 27.10.2021, 02:56 by Janet TolandJanet Toland
Databank Systems was set up in 1967 by a consortium of New Zealand banks to share computing services. This was the first instance of computers being used to integrate the ledger accounts of all trading banks within a country, an innovation facilitated by the relatively small size of the country, the rising use of cheque facilities, and the realization that a joint effort would provide a more efficient service by enabling the pooling of resources to achieve scale from expensive computing technology. In 1972, Databank introduced time slicing, allowing nonbank customers to use spare capacity on the Databank system. This use of Databank outside the banking systems was controversial and the management of Databank was increasingly at odds with the Bankers Association. This article uses the example of Databank to address the tensions between consortium computing and the sale of spare time resources in banking. “© 20XX IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. Permission from IEEE must be obtained for all other uses, in any current or future media, including reprinting/republishing this material for advertising or promotional purposes, creating new collective works, for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or reuse of any copyrighted component of this work in other works.”

History

Preferred citation

Toland, J. (2021). Consortium Computing and Time Slicing in the Banking Sector: Databank Systems Ltd New Zealand. IEEE Annals of the History of Computing, 43(2), 18-29. https://doi.org/10.1109/MAHC.2020.3007065

Journal title

IEEE Annals of the History of Computing

Volume

43

Issue

2

Publication date

01/04/2021

Pagination

18-29

Publisher

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)

Publication status

Published

Contribution type

Article

ISSN

1058-6180

eISSN

1934-1547