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Life history and matrix heterogeneity interact to shape metapopulation connectivity in spatially structured environments

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journal contribution
posted on 28.09.2020 by Jeffrey Shima, E Noonburg, Nicole Phillips
Metapopulation models have historically treated a landscape as a collection of habitat patches separated by a matrix of uniformly unsuitable habitat. This perspective is still apparent in many studies of marine metapopulations, in which recruitment variation is generally assumed to be primarily the result of variability in ocean currents and interactions with disperser behavior, with little consideration of spatial structure that can affect disperser viability. We use a simple model of dispersal of marine larvae to demonstrate how heterogeneity in dispersal habitat (i.e., the matrix) can generate substantial spatial variation in recruitment. Furthermore, we show how this heterogeneity can interact with larval life-history variation to create alternative patterns of source-sink dynamics. Finally, we place our results in the context of spatially structured matrix population models, and we propose the damping ratio of the connectivity matrix as a general and novel measure of landscape connectivity that may provide conceptual unification to the fields of metapopulation biology and landscape ecology. © 2010 by the Ecological Society of America.

History

Preferred citation

Shima, J., Noonburg, E. & Phillips, N. (2010). Life history and matrix heterogeneity interact to shape metapopulation connectivity in spatially structured environments. Ecology, 91(4), 1215-1224. https://doi.org/10.1890/08-2058.1

Journal title

Ecology

Volume

91

Issue

4

Publication date

01/01/2010

Pagination

1215-1224

Publisher

Wiley

Publication status

Published

Contribution type

Article

ISSN

0012-9658

eISSN

1939-9170

Language

en

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