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Gender attitudes affect the strength of the Frequency Code

conference contribution
posted on 2023-11-15, 21:26 authored by Sasha CalhounSasha Calhoun, Paul Warren, Jemima Agnew, Joy Mills
Following the Frequency Code, certain intonational meanings have a biological basis: high vs. low pitch are physically linked to small vs. large body size and to female vs. male gender (via sexual dimorphism), leading to affective meanings like submissiveness vs. dominance. While such associations appear widespread, the code assumes culture- and individual-specific ideological links, e.g., between submissiveness and femininity. We present Implicit Association Test experiments measuring associations between voice pitch and body size/gender. All participants showed these associations, however, their strength varied according to listeners’ genders and gender beliefs. We discuss implications for theories of pitch iconicity

Funding

Faculty Strategic Research Grant 2020: Calhoun, Sasha | Funder: VP RESEARCH

History

Preferred citation

Calhoun, S., Warren, P., Agnew, J. & Mills, J. (2022, January). Gender attitudes affect the strength of the Frequency Code.

Contribution type

Published Paper

Publication or Presentation Year

2022-01-01

Publication status

Published

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