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Measuring the Daylight Performance of Classrooms: Can a One Point Sensor Measurement Predict the Daylight Distribution within a Space?

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conference contribution
posted on 09.09.2020 by Aniebietabasi Ackley, Michael Donn, geoff Thomas
The New Zealand Ministry of Education (MoE) has begun measuring the light, temperature, noise and CO2 level of 21 selected schools using a single sensor. This sensor is being developed as a method for routine measurement in order to understand the performance of New Zealand's school buildings. This study used a Climate Based Daylight Modelling to appraise the MoE methodology, to determine what can be learned from the use of a single sensor in one location in a classroom, to estimate the lighting comfort across a space. Daylighting is focused upon because it has the most spatial variation in a space. The findings of this study support the assertion that a one-point sensor measurement on a vertical wall could predict illuminance across the centre of the horizontal work plane; and provide a useful benchmark to estimate the light distribution across a space. However, regardless of how representative of a space a one-point measurement is, it is difficult to quantify the daylight distribution over time throughout the space. If various daylight indicators are well documented and analysed alongside the measured data, a strategically positioned one-point sensor on the vertical wall could be useful in predicting the daylight quantity of a space.

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Preferred citation

Ackley, A., Donn, M. & Thomas, G. (2019, January). Measuring the Daylight Performance of Classrooms: Can a One Point Sensor Measurement Predict the Daylight Distribution within a Space?

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Published Paper

Publication or Presentation Year

01/01/2019

Publication status

Published

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